Fire Hydrants

Clearing Snow from Around Fire Hydrants


When winter is at its coldest, you may want to spend most of your time inside. However, it is important to keep an eye on what is happening outdoors, too. Winter weather can create fire safety hazards, such as ice or heavy snowfall that can obstruct fire hydrants. You can help reduce the risk by keeping fire hydrants accessible and clear of ice and snow.

Why It Matters


In the event of an emergency, crews can find and access the hydrant with the greatest possible speed. Those extra few seconds can make a major difference in an emergency. 

Fire trucks carry limited water, so one of the first tasks upon arrival is to locate the nearest fire hydrant for water. Hydrants covered with snow can be difficult to locate, and uncovering them can waste valuable time. 

How to Keep the Fire Hydrant Clear of Slow and Ice


If there is a fire hydrant near your home, please ensure you clear snow or ice at least three feet from around the hydrant. 
This is a great way to ensure it is always clear during a snow event. The Johnston-Grimes Metropolitan Fire Department also suggests shoveling a path from the sidewalk to the street or driveway so the hydrant is visible to firefighters from the road.


Who Should Clear Hydrants


It is generally considered the responsibility of the residents occupying the property near the hydrant. If you do not have a hydrant in your yard and the person is not able to maintain the clearance around it, consider adopting one. 
Hydrant Clearance